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Analytical summary - The physical environment

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Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources[1] in Lesotho and neighboring countries, 2008 and 1990.

Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources in Lesotho and neighboring countries 2008 and 1990.JPG

Percentage of the urban and rural population with access to improved drinking-water source in Lesotho and neighboring countries, 2008

Percentage of the urban and rural population with access to improved drinking-water source in Lesotho and neighboring countries 2008.JPG

Percentage of the population using improved sanitation facility in Lesotho and neighboring countries, 2008 and 1990

Percentage of the population using improved sanitation facility in Lesotho and neighboring countries 2008 and 1990.JPG

Percentage of the population using improved sanitation facility in Lesotho and neighboring countries, urban and rural, 2008

Percentage of the population using improved sanitation facility in Lesotho and neighboring countries urban and rural 2008.JPG

Percentage of the population living in urban areas in Lesotho and neighboring countries, 2008 and 1990 Percentage of the population living in urban areas in Lesotho and neighboring countries 2008 and 1990.JPG

Percentage of urban population living in slums[2] in Lesotho and neighboring countries, 2005 and 1990 Percentage of urban population living in slums in Lesotho and neighboring countries 2005 and 1990.JPG




  1. Improved drinking water source, by nature of its construction and design, is likely to protect the source from outside contamination, in particular from faecal matter. Improved drinking water sources include: -piped water into dwelling, plot or yard - public tap/stand pipe - tube well/borehole - protected dug well - protected spring and - rainwater collection. Note: Joint monitoring programme for water supply and sanitation [online database]. Geneva, WHO, UNICEF, 2008 (http://www.wssinfo.org/en/welcome.html)
  2. A slum household is defined as a group of individuals living under the same roof lacking one or more1 of the following conditions: Access to improved water, Access to improved sanitation, Sufficient-living area, Durability of housing, Security of tenure. However, since information on secure tenure is not available for most of the countries, only the first four indicators are used to define slum household, and then to estimate the proportion of urban population living in slums. The indicator is intended to provide an overview of the share of urban population living in conditions of poverty and physical and environmental deprivation. For details, see United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) (2003). Global Urban Observatory. Nairobi (Available at the Web site http://www.unhabitat.org/programmes/guo)