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Apropriação e participação comunitária

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O conteúdo em Portugês estará disponível em breve.

Health systems can be transformed to deliver better health in ways that people value: equitably, people-centred and with the knowledge that health authorities administer public health functions to secure the well-being of all communities. These reforms demand new forms of leadership for health. The public sector needs to have a strong role in leading and steering public health care reforms and this function should be exercised through collaborative models of policy dialogue with multiple stakeholders, because this is what people expect and because it is the most effective.

A more effective public sector stewardship of the health sector is justified on the grounds of greater efficiency and equity. This crucial stewardship role should not be misinterpreted as a mandate for centralized planning and complete administrative control of the health sector. While some types of health challenges, for example public health emergencies or disease eradication, may require authoritative command and control management, effective stewardship increasingly relies on “mediation” to address current and future complex health challenges.

The interests of public authorities, the health sector and the public are closely intertwined. Health systems are too complex: the domains of the modern state and civil society are interconnected, with constantly shifting boundaries. Effective mediation in health must replace overly simplistic management models of the past and embrace new mechanisms for multi-stakeholder policy dialogue to work out the strategic orientations for primary health care reforms.

Community ownership and participation[1]

At the core of policy dialogue is the participation of the key stakeholders. Health authorities and ministries of health, which have a primary role, have to bring together:

  • the decision-making power of the political authorities
  • the rationality of the scientific community
  • the commitment of the professionals
  • the values and resources of civil society.

This is a process that requires time and effort. It would be an illusion to expect primary health care policy formation to be wholly consensual, as there are too many conflicting interests.

However, experience shows that the legitimacy of policy choices depends less on total consensus than on procedural fairness and transparency. Without a structured, participatory policy dialogue, policy choices are vulnerable to appropriation by interest groups, changes in political personnel or donor fickleness. Without a social consensus, it is also much more difficult to engage effectively with stakeholders whose interests diverge from the options taken by primary health care reforms, including vested interests such as those of the tobacco or alcohol industries, where effective primary health care reform constitutes a direct threat.

This section of the health system profile is structured as follows:

3.3.1 Analytical summary
3.3.2 Participation as an individual, and user and provider interactions
3.3.2.1 Health literacy levels
3.3.2.2 People-centredness of care
3.3.2.3 Satisfaction with consultation processes
3.3.2.4 Patient health care behaviours
3.3.2.5 Structural issues
3.3.3 Local community mobilization
3.3.3.1 Services design issues at locality
3.3.3.2 Accountability of health services to locality and community watchdog functions
3.3.4 Civil society involvement
3.3.4.1 As a partner in policy-making
3.3.4.2 Accountability and "watchdog" functions



References

  1. Systems thinking for health systems strengthening (pdf 1.54Mb). Geneva, World Health Organization, 2009