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Analytical summary - Health system outcomes

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The Government of Sierra Leone, in consultation with partners, has developed a 6-year National Health Sector Strategic Plan, which provides the framework for improving the health of the nation.[1]

For sustainability in the implementation of the National Health Sector Strategic Plan, the Government and health partners developed and recently signed a compact agreement, with the objective to set out a framework to guide all health partners working in Sierra Leone adhere to the principles and approaches set out in the International Health Partnership Global Compact Agreement, which reflects the goals of the Paris Declaration.

Furthermore, the partners agreed to implement the Joint Programme of Work and Funding, a multiyear framework developed through interactive and participatory process. Among other things, this was developed to improve allocation of resources to agreed strategic priorities and programmes, and to focus on outputs and outcomes and their contribution to the overall Agenda for Change and Millennium Development Goal attainment.[1][2][3]

This funding mechanism is especially important as the health sector has been grossly underfunded in the past and has never reached the Abuja Declaration target of 15% of total government allocation.[4] In fact, in 2011, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation received 8.2% of the total Government budget.

In line with the decentralization process, the Government transfers a proportion of the national health budget to local councils.

Generally, the health sector has made some progress, as assessed during 2010 using National Health Sector Strategic Plan performance indicators (see table).[1][4]

Summary of National Health Sector Strategic Plan performance indicators[1]

Key health initiatives implemented in 2010 to accelerate progress towards attaining the Millennium Development Goals using a health system approach included implementing the Free Health Care Initiative and promoting maternal and child health campaigns to improve health outcomes.

Following the introduction of the Free Health Care Initiative on 27 April 2010, the reported case fatality rates for malaria, diarrhoea, acute respiratory infection and anaemia among children reduced dramatically in 2010 compared with 2009. This suggests increased quality of care in terms of access and availability of health commodities.[4]

The capacity of the Ministry of Health and Sanitation is constrained through the paucity of appropriate skills at the central level of the Ministry and the need for prioritization and delegation of responsibilities to focal persons with specified targets. This notwithstanding, the Government has adopted as a major priority the efficient and coordinated implementation of the National Health Sector Strategic Plan 2010–2015 in order to permit Sierra Leone to make faster progress towards achieving the goals of the Agenda for Change and the health-related Millennium Development Goals.[4]




References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 National Health Sector Strategic Plan 2010–2015 (pdf 1.09Mb) Government of Sierra Leone, Ministry of Health and Sanitation, 2009
  2. National Health Sector Strategic Plan 2010–2015 Joint Programme of Work and Funding (JPWF) 2012–2014 (pdf 2.79Mb) Government of Sierra Leone, Ministry of Health and Sanitation, 2012
  3. Health Compact (pdf 510.02kb) Government of Sierra Leone, 2011
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Performance report. Government of Sierra Leone, Ministry of Health and Sanitation, 2010